One Strike, You’re Out: Fucking It Up With Your Friend of Color

Content Advisory: racism, fragility. Intended audience is white. 

IMG_8050

Lately, I’ve been lucky enough to form several new friendships. As friendships are wont to do, some become closer than others. I really like my new friends, but I feel a special kinship with one of them. We have a lot in common with cooking, fashion, kids, babywearing, and social justice activism. It’s a joy to talk to her about fun stuff. We also complain to each other about the shit in our lives. It helps soothe our souls to commiserate.

She was telling me one day recently about another friendship that had recently broken up. Like most falling outs tend to go, someone had been really out of line, there was a failure of communication, hurt feelings, and some shit talking thrown on the fan. Her friend had screwed up big time. My friend was talking passionately about how her ex-friend had apologized and requested a sit down to talk face to face, and how ridiculous the request was. My friend is DONE with that other person. And – I was confused. While I believe it’s everyone’s right to set a hard boundary for self-preservation regardless, I still was puzzling for a few minutes over why the apology and the sit down request were so out of line with my friend. It sounded perfectly reasonable. I would probably do the same thing if I wanted to try and make up with a friend.

And then I realized why it was so out of line, or perhaps remembered: my friend is black. Her ex-friend is white.

If you’re a white person like me, with a similar upbringing, you probably have not thought much about interracial friendship dynamics. Even if you’re very interested in social justice issues and feel pretty good about your awareness level of The Right and Wrong Things to Say About Race, I’m willing to bet you might stumble into the same pitfall my friend’s ex-friend (and me, in those puzzled moments) fell into: you forget about racism and how it impacts the dynamic of a friendship. Let’s break that down.

The more intimacy you have with a friend, the more likely you are to see them as an individual, separated from other major groups they may be a part of. In an interracial relationship, there’s a real threat of post-racial thinking sneaking into people’s heads. Like hey, we are past that whole race thing! It doesn’t apply to us! My friend is my friend, they’re not a black person. (Or an Asian person, a Hispanic person, etc.)

Similarly, the more comfortable you are with a person, the more you trust that they will forgive mistakes you might make or weaknesses you might have, right? Between two white friends, sure. It’s totally reasonable to ask for and expect a chance to make things right. Between a white friend a black friend, where the white friend fucked up? No. This is slipping into the same post-racial thinking.

No matter what point in life you happen to start having friends of color, particularly black friends, and no matter how good of friends you are or become, there’s a single unifying true statement:

You, as a white person, do not deserve a second chance. You probably don’t really deserve a first chance.

I see you bristling. Put down your hackles and take a deep breath. I’m not talking about you personally. Your value or worthiness as a friend or person is not in question.

You can find literally pages of personal essays from black women in particular about how they repeatedly try then finally break up with us en masse. The refrain “never again” in regards to women of color trying to be friends with white women is common. Our friends of color are putting their trust in us to be their friend, and not a white person, and we fail them over and over again. As upset and wounded as we might feel about a failed interracial friendship, the stakes are so much higher for our PoC counterparts. The more intimacy involved, the worse the betrayal.

Our culture here in the US – and also abroad – is where being a white person is being considered a default and neutral human. A system that, by default, people of color are generally penalized. Even if they’re personally having a great go of life or benefiting from programs designed to increase equity, they’re still impacted by a variety of higher risks and dangers that continue to contribute to a legacy of trauma from racism. Seriously, I could hyperlink each letter in this whole paragraph to both scientific studies and personal anecdotes about the shitty impact of racism and additional intersectional issues that pile on top of racism – ableism, sizeism, mental health stigma, gender issues, and on and on. (Why didn’t I hyperlink every letter? Well, I believe in your ability and responsibility to give educating yourself a go.)

The point being that even for PoC who are doing very well for themselves, they are still dealing with a bunch of bullshit on a daily basis that you as a white person do not. And chances are very good that your friend of color has been giving white people a chance, over and over, and has been failed over and over.

You simply cannot ignore the power imbalance in an interracial relationship. If you fuck up once – don’t expect second chances, however reasonable it might feel to ask for one. If you get a second chance? Don’t squander it.

I can hear your responses in my head, because they’re what I think too: but doesn’t that mean I’ll feel nervous to talk to my friend because I’ll be nervous of fucking it up? Yes. Your friend of color is already doing that because fucking up in a racist society means they could literally be killed. You can be a little nervous and uncomfortable and think before you speak more for your friend, it’s literally the least you can do. Other responses: but what if the friend of color hurts me and makes mistakes? Well, again, think of the power dynamic. You’re in a position where you can add to a legacy of generational shittiness by not forgiving them or shit talking them all over because that’s what you’d do to a white friend -or- you can show a little fucking grace by giving them second chances in your relationship that the massive system of violence they live in doesn’t give them. And what about conflicts between friends of color, what about those? you may find yourself asking. Well, we as white people don’t really have anything to do with that, do we? But if you are really curious, you can start by seeing what they say about it.

Bottom line? Do your very best to not fuck it up with your friends of color. While you’re at it, start thinking about the power dynamics of having a relationship with someone in any other oppressed group. Do you have a very fat friend? A friend with a disability? A queer friend? Ohhh, shucks. Looks like there are power dynamics there, too.

Time to get to work, fellow whities!

Advertisements

37 Comments Add yours

  1. Allie says:

    Hi! Thank you for such a thought-provoking post. I have a question – do you mean that the threshold of friendship between POC and non-POC is higher in relation to all things (as in general friendship disputes), or more limited to within a race context? Thank you

    Like

    1. LividLipids says:

      I would generally say that this applies to all aspects of friendship for PoC, as racism in their daily lives is something that affects all aspects of their lives and relationships.

      Like

  2. Brittany says:

    Excellent excellent post!

    Like

  3. Stevie says:

    I’m sorry, but this is patronizing as fuck. You, a white person, decided while you were talking to your black friend that you had suddenly transcended a barrier in your conversation and you began reading her mind? Just because she’s black? And what you heard her mind (not voice) say was that white people don’t ever deserve the right to ask for a second chance with a PoC friend, no matter what the nature of the disagreement? That level of making assumptions based on your own white understanding is really bizarre. People of color are allowed to make decisions about who to be friends with– for white people to preemptively choose to avoid treating their friendships with PoC as potentially salvageable based purely on racially based assumptions that ultimately came from a white person– that is staggeringly misguided.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. LividLipids says:

      Hi Stevie! I’m sorry this struck a bad chord with you.

      I actually talked at length with the PoC friend in question about the topic and asked for her consent before writing this piece. So I can confirm that her voice said these things too and that I wasn’t just mindreading!

      You are absolutely right that PoC are allowed to make their own choices. I don’t believe my article says that they cannot or should not give their white friends second, third, or however many chances they feel like.

      My advice to other white people is just to recognize we, en masse and as a whole, don’t deserve them. It has zero to do with the individual circumstances and everything to do with the cultural system we exist in. I also do not advise white people to treat their friendships with PoC as unsalvageable, just that they should not expect to be forgiven if they screw it up and very grateful if they get more chances.

      Of course, if you are PoC and feel differently, cool! As you know, PoC are not a monolith. Your mileage may vary.

      Thanks for reading!

      Like

      1. Stevie says:

        If what you mean to say really is that white people shouldn’t EXPECT second chances from PoC when they are the ones that screwed up, then of course that makes some sense. That is not, however, what I got from this post. What you explicitly stated was that the white person in the story was wrong in even apologizing to your black friend, and that’s what I take issue with. There are times when an apology is wrong. For instance, if you’ve hurt someone so badly that the sight of your name would hurt them further. But not every single conflict with a person of color will be that type of conflict. To assume that their race, combined with yours, elevates all possible screw-ups to that level makes too many assumptions about people of color, based purely on what a few of your friends told you.

        The other issue, which other commenters have also raised, is that your framework doesn’t make any room for any other marginalized identities to exist. Let’s imagine a Black cis straight college-educated man and his nonbinary trans disabled gay white friend who is working on their GED but hasn’t been able to get it yet. Let’s imagine that the latter person really screws up– maybe they used really offensive language and thought it was ok because of context, but it wasn’t. Is it so wrong for that person to apologize? Is it so wrong for them to expect another chance? I don’t think so. White oppressed people can make mistakes because they didn’t have access to the same resources as a lot of folks with a social justice background. That doesn’t mean that they can’t hold marginalized identities too, and it doesn’t mean that there will never be a situation where they hold less power than a person of color. The world is nuanced and sticky. When we make blanket statements that are supposed to encompass everyone, (especially about who is allowed to apologize to whom) it flattens the intricacies of life. And even though you said that your PoC friends are totally with you on this, I honestly doubt that most people of color would say that they prefer the kind of treatment you suggest from long-term close friends. For instance, I’m PoC and mad at a white friend right now. I wouldn’t give her a second chance, but I would fucking love it if she asked for one! I’m just saying we don’t need to all behave like robots, trying to solve radically different situations with the same action every time.

        Like

  4. I would say that there is no way not to fuck up, no matter how careful the white friend is. I will never “not be white” and my race will always impact the dynamic. The relationship will be rife with possible emotional triggers for the person who is black/brown. But if two people are invested in an authentic and emotionally intimate connection you can address the fuck ups honestly and keep moving forward. Some people are not emotionally able or ready to do that. So, I would say, if you are white and want to have friends of a different race, it will take work and care and you may end up being rejected. That is the risk you take in reaching across the divide to connect with any person, but especially in interracial relationships. It’s no one’s fault, and there are no “bad” people, just people struggling at this point in our country’s history of white supremacy to reach out to one another and begin the healing. The healing journey is different for each of us and it takes a long time. There are no personal guarantees.

    Like

    1. LividLipids says:

      Hi Mahina! Thanks for taking the time to read.

      I think you are absolutely correct that there is no way not to fuck up at some point, in some way, as a white person in relationships with PoC. It is just literally what most if not all of us have been taught is fine or we don’t even realize the microaggressions we leak. We definitely should put work and care into our friendships with PoC, just with some extra TLC and attention to the power dynamic from racism.

      I also disagree and think there absolutely are bad people. There are plenty of people who genuinely want to either ignore or push backwards racial healing. If you mean that these mistakes don’t make you a bad person as a white – not necessarily, no, but I also do not like hanging out with other white people that suck at handling their mistakes with humility and without lashing out at those they’ve already hurt.

      Like

  5. HR says:

    This seems like a well-intentioned piece that leads to a faulty and simplistic conclusion. It should be a given that POC don’t owe friendship to white people at all and those who decide not to have intimate relationships of any kind with any white people are making a legitimate choice that needn’t be justified. White people who want to respect POC should respect that choice instead of complaining about it.

    And yet the argument made here flattens the nuances and contexts that inform friendships. What kind of fuck up are we talking about? Perpetual lateness? A micro-aggressive comment? Forgetting someone’s birthday? Is there such a thing as a fuck up that isn’t about race (or gender, class, ability, sexuality, size, gender identity etc)? Are friends capable of mutually making those errors? The mistakes within interracial friendship often do have racialized undertones, but sometimes they don’t. It is true that racialized dynamics are frequently ignored, but the solution is not an overly deterministic view in which absolutely every conflict between people is about systemic racial oppression and nothing exists outside of that.

    The other troubling conclusion of this argument, is that it mentions other forms of systemic oppression without acknowledging that sometimes friends live with different privileges/oppressed experiences, and identical articles like this based on cis/trans, straight/queer, poor/not poor, men/women, university educated/not university educated, able-bodied/disabled, fat/not fat dynamics would inevitably fall into the same trap of reductively ignoring context and making human relationships a zero-sum game wherein the person with privilege is always in the wrong. I am reminded of this piece, which for what it’s worth, was written by a trans woman of colour: http://everydayfeminism.com/2016/02/social-justice-abuse-ipv/

    Some people really don’t deserve a second chance, and some people simply have no second chances to give. But this article constructs a world in which there is no solution for murky conflicts within friendships between people who hold different amounts of power based on different parts of their identity that can’t simply be boiled down to ‘this person is more privileged and therefore in the wrong’. It also reads more like a scolding threat and less like an appeal to white people to accept and understand why POC aren’t obligated to begin or maintain friendships with white people. You have simply told white people that they are not allowed to make ANY mistakes with friends of color (an entirely unrealistic goal) instead of encouraging them to accept that they will inevitably make them and should reflect on the hurt caused, regardless of their intentions, and regardless of whether or not POC friends choose to keep them in their lives.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. LividLipids says:

      “reads more like a scolding threat” – womp womp, tone policing. My personal blog isn’t the place to whine that I didn’t write it polite enough for you to consider more deeply.

      Like

      1. HR says:

        You’re white, it is totally within reason to question your tone in a discussion of race issues. Need I remind you that you don’t actually have the experience of being marginalized in conversations about race on account of your own racial identity? Because that’s what tone policing is actually about; it’s about silencing POC in conversations about race, not white people. Or was this whole article just a way for you to separate yourself from other white people and position yourself as a better than those other wayward white folks not as enlightened as you?

        Liked by 1 person

      2. LividLipids says:

        I see tone policing happen in all kinds of conversations about a variety of issues – it’s a common thing people do to try and get other people to shut up.

        I have no idea about the appropriateness of telling someone to change their tone when they are calling out/calling in their own, besides that my friends and local community, both white and PoC, give me positive feedback. Generally the “you are too mean so I don’t want to listen” comes from the people who are being called out/in. As you know, nobody is a monolith. I’m still going to go with what I’ve learned from them since they’re the friends and community I’m most directly working/friending with.

        I assume most of the people reading this post are white since it’s intended for a white audience. Are you PoC? I’m glad to hear about your experience. Do you have a blog also that I can read?

        Like

      3. I think the HR’s comment indicates that they did consider your argument deeply.

        Like

  6. Micheal says:

    I don’t want to come close to implying that there isn’t a racial power dynamic underlying all interracial relationships/friendships, there is, and I’ve seen it cause serious issues in cases where unintentional racism (sometimes on my part) created a divide which resulted in the termination of a relationship. This article addresses that, and rightfully so. However, I still have a massive issue with this piece, perhaps best encapsulated in this sentence: “Do your very best to not fuck it up with your friends of color.” Yes, don’t intentionally insult or demean any of your friends, however the cold, impersonal approach to relationships offered in this article, in my opinion, effectively creates a wall in between the white subject and the racial Other in place of real solidarity. I may be speaking from my own experience, which is, I acknowledge, a white one, but I simply cannot imagine a functionable/enjoyable relationship with (and this applies to both parties) a person of color predicated off of this superego-esque pressure “not to fuck up” underlying the entire relation. I recognize that, of course, people of color undoubtedly experience this same pressure in several of their other relationships in a racist society, with much larger risks such as violence or death. Where I have to disagree with you is your notion that the solution to this lies in creating more ethical pressure on the other end. The friendships I (and I suspect most other people) cherish the most are ones which are grounded in real communication with the other, and a mutual appreciation for the other’s positives AND negatives. Compare this to the relationships which this article structures: ones where you consistently fear “fucking it up,” appreciate the other’s willingness to even attempt to engage with you (whether or not they may be an asshole), and carry the thought that in instances where you’re an asshole, you “do not deserve a second chance.” If this kind of advice was put in any other context, it would come off as quasi-abusive. I recognize that I’m fundamentally misinformed on this issue due to my own racial experience, but my god, this is is not what friendship looks like. Yes, I know personal narratives don’t really mean anything in argumentation, but the thought of approaching any of my PoC friends in the way this article outlines is absurd and impersonal.
    Racism permeates white discourse nearly universally, and will, unfortunately, emerge in interracial relations. This is no new information. If the ultimate goal in social justice activism is some kind of solidarity which acknowledges this, I really just cannot see how this kind of approach is achieving that. It’s naive to ignore the fact that a friend of yours may be black and that this has a different relational dynamic than you may have with a white friend, but to suggest that the way to mediate this problem is by constantly second-guessing and being humbled that such a person would consider being your friend is just not what a healthy friendship looks like. I cannot imagine having the kind of cognitive dissonance towards someone in the way this article describes while also considering them a good friend. I’m totally willing to accept that I’m wrong on this, but as things currently stand for me, what this article outlines is not real friendship.

    Like

    1. LividLipids says:

      “I recognize that I’m fundamentally misinformed on this issue due to my own racial experience.” – Okay, so you’ve hit the first step. Why are you weighing in very passionately about a topic about which you are very misinformed? Would you do this in your workplace, or respond to a close family member when they asked you to seriously consider an issue about which you are not just a blank slate, but admittedly misinformed by your experience?

      “Yes, I know personal narratives don’t really mean anything in argumentation, but the thought of approaching any of my PoC friends in the way this article outlines is absurd and impersonal.” Given that you say you are misinformed about race, and doesn’t count for anything in an argument about race, why would you still not treat your PoC friends, who fundamentally have the kind of judgment and experience you admit you don’t have, with respect and humility when it comes to considering these issues? I also fail to see how taking responsibility for your weaknesses about racial issues and power dynamics with honesty and humility is impersonal and absurd. Why would it be absurd and impersonal to approach something by listening to friends and admitting you don’t know much about something they know?

      Like

  7. Dylan says:

    The problem here is that the ideas you expressing perpetuate racism.
    Racism has a simple definition: Treating a person differently based on their race.
    The ONLY way to end racism is if we all start treating each other the same. I should not have to be extra careful because a friend has a different skin tone, and I should be able to expect them to treat me the same as they would someone who shares the same skin color they have. Anything else is by definition racism, and I don’t really need racist friends.

    Like

    1. LividLipids says:

      Hi Dylan! I initially replied to your comment when I actually intended to reply to someone about toast (oops)!

      I think unfortunately your idea about racism having a simple definition and ending racism being as simple as treating everyone the same is not very helpful towards actually trying to end racism.

      And sure, in a wonderful utopian future, we shouldn’t have to be extra careful about our relationships with people who have different physical characteristics than us. I’m willing to bet, though, you are already treating different relationships with varying levels of care, respect, and thoughtfulness in regards to what that individual relationship needs to be maintained or the person on the other end needs, or a power dynamic – do you speak to everyone in your life the same way, or do you tailor how you speak to some people? For example, do you avoid cursing at work but let loose at home, or do you talk about sex with your grandma, a 6 year old neighbor, and close friend who has experienced sexual trauma the same way?

      I’m betting that, even if you feel like you are “very equal” in how you treat ALL the people in your life, you have a lot of variance from relationship to relationship. The only thing holding you back from being more respectful of the terrible effects of racism on interracial relationships is you deciding it is worth your time to think about and then do. So why don’t you think it’s important? Probably because you’ve been taught that pretending you don’t see race is a good option rather than by acknowledging it’s a real issue that real people face.

      Thanks for reading and thinking!

      Like

  8. Ray says:

    LOVED this piece. My only question is why the picture of the toast?

    Like

    1. LividLipids says:

      Hey Ray, glad you enjoyed it! White toast slathered in mayonnaise is a joke both about skin color and stereotypical food choices of white people. This was also a picture of mine and my kids’ breakfast (before topped with eggs).

      Like

  9. deanna says:

    Okay, so the take-away message here is that friendships across racial divides are inherently fragile, freighted, and can be terminated by the most racialized person in them without any accountability or explanation because of any perceived fuckup? Due respect, that’s bullshit. Everyone comes into relationships with their own array of joys and traumas, and this formula privileges some over others to a ridiculous degree.
    Don’t get me wrong – I like the values from which this view flows, and it’s clear that your heart is in the right place. But jeez, you’ve put that sociological barbie in an ideological microwave and warped it all to hell.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. LividLipids says:

      I think it’s really apt you’ve chosen Barbie here – racism really is kind of like Barbie. It’s very white, very out of touch with reality, and I wouldn’t mind putting it in the microwave and warping it. It may at least then break down enough to be useless and tossed in the garbage.

      What in my essay strikes you as not recognizing the individual intersections of personal relationships?

      Why are you uncomfortable with giving the ultimate privilege of whether or not a friendship should continue to PoC, if it’s not about white people losing the privilege of our current power dynamic?

      Like

  10. Hadda says:

    There are so many levels of fucking up in a friendship. We all have different perspectives on what is and isn’t a serious offence. And we all have blind spots and sore spots. It feels like there’s a danger of losing touch with basic decency, self-responsibility and what it is to be human if “one strike, you’re out” is considered a reasonable attitude within any friendship.
    Self protection is one thing. But aggressive defensiveness (which might include shunning, shaming or withholding forgiveness) can be a very unhealthy coping strategy that causes damaging ripples all round and only perpetuates the problem.

    Like

    1. LividLipids says:

      Sure, but kind of my whole point is that this is already an existing phenomena and coping strategy for so many PoC, especially women. PoC trying to be friends with whites are angry and hurt. I don’t blame them. My article isn’t suggesting PoC start doing this – it’s that it’s already happening in direct response to generations of violent oppression by whites. So we white people should be aware of it and try to make things fairer by taking on the emotional labor for awhile – we’ve been oblivious to PoC doing this already.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Hadda says:

        I see your point. It’s an interesting and thought provoking article. Thank you.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. LividLipids says:

        Thanks for reading and engaging!

        Like

  11. SheilaB says:

    Wow. What a childish and condescending attitude towards PoC – you think that they’re not strong enough to deal with real friendships that include mistakes and fuck-ups? Your blog reads like the self-important and overweening journal of a middle schooler.

    Like

    1. LividLipids says:

      Hi Sheila! Thanks for reading and thinking. What part of my writing indicates to you that PoC aren’t strong, etc.? I love to learn!

      Like

  12. Amy says:

    GREAT article, LividLipids! Also wanted to say how impressed I am with the level of patience and sensitivity you’re using in handling these comments. Kudos to you. Reactions might only grow as your article makes the rounds – stay strong, speak truth, and care for yourself. ❤

    – a fellow whitey doing my best to combat systemic racism

    Liked by 1 person

    1. LividLipids says:

      Thank you for the kind words, and for reading! ❤

      Like

  13. Simon Mimose says:

    There’s nothing worse than the assumption of race. Keep in mind that there are some of us that choose not to go by black or white, based on the idea that race isn’t scientifically supported, and is a social construct. Also note, that referring to someone as African or Asian, only refers to their place of origin. As well, there are those of us who believe people of color to be a derogatory term, as it suggests there people without color. You either support union or support separation. You have a choice.

    Like

    1. LividLipids says:

      Hi! Thanks for reading and commenting! Yes, any particular group of people are not a monolith! I work with what the community I interact with most often finds preferable. I will try to look up what you mean by union and separation, as I’ve not heard of that pairing/phrase before.

      Like

  14. Justin Hanvey says:

    Convicting and needed food for thought and praxis. Thank you for writing this. I’ll be sitting with this a while.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. LividLipids says:

      Thank you for reading and thinking!

      Like

  15. Ethan says:

    There is so much i disagree with in this article that i wouldn’t know where to start, but THIS is the sort of article that hurts black healing, THIS is the sort of article that hurts social justice. To treat PoC relationships like something you have to walk on eggshells to maintain a relationship with, and saying white people don’t even deserve their friendship like they are some sort of higher power is grossly dehumanizing. To put them on a higher pastille to the point where you would say “You don’t deserve a first chance, much less a second” and then say “If they mess up, forgive them or you’re the problem” is so far from what anybody wants. Have you ever talked with a PoC that wasn’t a sjw extremist? They would think you are insane. As somebody mix race, please speak for yourself. Don’t speak for my white side, and don’t speak for my black side. See me as a member of your species, don’t see me for my race.

    Like

    1. LividLipids says:

      Hi! I was seriously considering your question today about talking to any PoC who are not SJW extremists. While I know/am related to some, I’m pleased to find that my PoC friends are all SJW extremists!

      If you don’t like social justice issues being discussed critically and radically, or think of yourself as white, articles like these, written for white people who need help processing race issues, are probably not for you.

      Thank you for reading!

      Like

  16. Kartoffel says:

    I agree with both the article itself and the criticism of it. While it does erase a lot of nuance and could perpetuate some abusive behaviours as HR asserted, I get the picture that the article is trying to paint. Yes, it’s overly simplistic, but by generalising this so wildly we white folks are forced to exercise some judgment as to our own actions – it doesn’t let anyone off the hook for the shittiness we are wont to do. And yes, it brings up the potential for abuse in this dynamic, fair enough. But we know that – we as discerning readers can put that in. I don’t think the author was calling for allowing for abuse. As a queer, mentally ill guy, I understand where I stand in many of my friendships and relationships, and the respect said relationships are based on. As for fucking up, that one’s fairly unambiguous – don’t be actively racist and prove to your friend that you don’t respect their identity. That much, I think we can all agree on, much as it doesn’t leave much room for growth.

    On one hand, yes, phrasing could arguably be flawed, I personally don’t disagree with that. But the sentiment, the content and context, is solid, and the junction of these literally forces us to think about it. And believe me, I will continue to do so.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s